Top NHL Fighters by Weight Class

SUPER-HEAVYWEIGHT

Brian McGrattan

McGrattan

The grizzled fighter has been in his fair share of tussles, and after seeing his fight against up-and-comer Patrick Bordeleau (below), it’s clear that Calgary’s Brian McGrattan still has his touch (that touch being a pile-driving right-hand).  McGrattan began his professional career in the American league, the way most enforcers do.  In 2004-2005, the year of the NHL lockout, McGrattan had his most prolific fighting season, tallying 551 penalty minutes in just 71 AHL games played.  With the extra media coverage and publicity the AHL gained during that year, he earned an NHL spot with the Ottawa Senators the following season.  During his three years in Ottawa, McGrattan fought 37 times and earned a reputation as one of the best fighters in hockey.

After some problems with drugs and alcohol, McGrattan is more than three years clean and sober, and once again sits atop of the hockey food-chain.

HEAVYWEIGHT

Milan Lucic

Lucic

Perhaps the best-overall fighter in the NHL, Lucic has a stunning 30-10-4 fighting record, according to hockeyfights.com, since joining the Boston Bruins as a 19-year-old.  But, lately his offensive contributions have kept him out of the penalty box.  He is averaging 17:19 of ice-time per-game, third most among Boston forwards.

MIDDLEWEIGHT

Brandon Prust

brandon-prust-fighting

Prust, a veteran of 91 NHL tilts, is known for often taking on much larger opponents.  But, even with a size disadvantage, Prust has a winning fight record: 41-32-18 according to hockeyfights.com.  He began his NHL career in Calgary, making a name for himself playing with McGrattan, who helped mold him into the world-class scrapper he is today.

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Takes Two to Tango

There was quite a bit of commotion surrounding Tampa’s 1-3-1 trap and Philly’s unwillingness to break the puck out in last night’s game in Tampa Bay.

As you can see in the video the Flyers would not advance the puck into the Lightning’s neural zone trap.  The play was blown dead in accordance with rule 72 which places the onus on the attacking team to keep play in continuous motion.  The Flyers continued their refusal to advance the puck a number of times after the instance shown in the video, each time forcing the referee to stop the play.

Former coach Mac Crawford shared his opinion on TSN during the game and said that Tampa Bay was to blame for the inactivity.

“This is typically something that could really hurt hockey,” Crawford said.  “Fans don’t want to watch that type of system where nothing happens.”

Aaron Ward, former NHL player and three-time Stanely Cup winner, also spoke about the matter on TSN.

“You know what’s in your locker room,” Ward said.  “Play to your strengths.  Understand what you have out there. Ohlund is gone, Hedman is gone, you wanna win a game and that’s what the National Hockey League is about, winning games.  Is it fun to watch?  No.  But, the bottom line is, in the National Hockey league you are judged on wins and wins alone and the two points in the column.”

I tend to agree with Ward on this issue.  The rules are in place for a reason and they clearly state that it is up to the attacking team to adjust to their opponents defensive strategy.  It is interesting to watch coaches battle each other with different strategies and last night peter Laviolette declined Guy Boucher’s invitation to dance.